DOGS, LIVING

April 15, 2018

Bringing Your Dog to Denmark

Bringing your Dog to Denmark

As you’ve probably heard by now, we’re relocating to Denmark, and we’ve gotten a lot of questions about what it’s like to move internationally with a dog.

For Denmark the process is pretty simple, but the regulations and requirements are different depending on the country you are coming from, and the country you are going to, and can also change annually, so although I hope that this post is helpful, it is very important that you research the process for your unique situation. Don’t forget to also research the re-entry process for your country of origin. I recommend being vigilant to check for mandatory quarantines that might exist on either side. Mandatory quarantine is when a country requires that you pay to board your dog in a government quarantine center for a certain period of time upon entry (sometimes as long as 60 days). Quarantines can be expensive as an owner, but also traumatizing for your pet.

I also recommend that you work with a vet who has experience with international travel or relocation, as that will make the process much easier and special accreditation is often required for one or more of the steps below.

APHIS, via the USDA, is the office in the US that you can use as a resource. Here’s the website that our veterinarian recommended we follow.

TO BRING A DOG INTO DENMARK THEY NEED:

  • An ISO-compliant micro-chip (if its not, they’ll need a second one).
  • A rabies vaccine administered *after* the micro-chip, but no less than 21 days before departure (pets cannot enter the country sooner than 21 days after a rabies vaccination).
  • An EU health certificate signed by an accredited veterinarian and endorsed by your local APHIS office (cannot be issued more than 10 days before departure).
  • APHIS endorsement of the EU health certificate.

Although not required for entry, it is a good idea to bring copies of all your pet’s past health records, as well as 3-5 copies of their vaccination record so that you have extras on hand for groomers, boarders, trainers etc.

These are the basic requirements that we have to meet before Walter can arrive in Denmark, and we just completed the last step on Saturday, so he’s ready to roll!

If you’re in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area I highly recommend working with Dr. Donald at Modern Love Veterinary, located in the North Loop. She’s been very knowledgeable about the process and has helped us every step of the way (she’s also just a great vet in general). The total cost for his micro-chip, vaccinations and health certificate came to about $550.

Selecting an airline and preparing your pet for the flight is an entirely separate ordeal. I’ll be doing a second post detailing what that is like and what we’ve been doing to prepare Walter for the voyage!

Meet Dani

Just a girl who loves planning, systems, organization, and a drawer full of pens! 

Dani Bruflodt has nearly a decade of experience as a consultant, designer, speaker, and wellness advocate.  

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  1. Travelling Internationally with a Dog - Thyme Is Honey

    April 16th, 2018 at 2:47 pm

    […] gotten a lot of questions about traveling internationally with a dog! I also did a post about bringing your dog into Denmark, which you can read […]